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Archive for the ‘Toolkit’ Category

Federal Data Breach Regulations Take Effect Nov. 1, 2018

Starting Nov. 1, 2018, Canada’s federal Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) will require organizations that suffer a data breach involving personal information to:

  1. Report the breach to the Privacy Commissioner of Canada.
  2. Give notice of the breach to affected individuals.
  3. Maintain records of data breaches that affect personal information

In order to avoid fines and penalties, organizations will need to understand the basic requirements of PIPEDA.

Learn more and download the Compliance Bulletin today.


Employer Guide to Cannabis Legalization

Download the Employer’s Guide to Cannabis Legalization today.

Cannabis, often referred to as weed, pot or marijuana, is one of the most commonly used psychoactive drugs in the world. And while the medicinal use of marijuana has been permissible in Canada for some time, the Cannabis Act legalizes the drug for recreational use nationwide.

Among other things, the federal law, which has a target implementation date of summer 2018, allows provinces to create specific regulations for marijuana use related to impaired driving and workplace safety. While this may sound simple on paper, a 2017 survey of Human Resources Professionals Association members found that 45 per cent of respondents did not believe their current workplace policies effectively address issues that may arise with the legalization of marijuana.

How Will the Act Affect the Workplace?

While it is uncertain how much the legalization of recreational marijuana will impact the workplace, employers are concerned it will have a direct effect on:

  1. Workplace health and safety
  2. The use of motor vehicles for work purposes
  3. The scope and type of disciplinary procedures
  4. Work performance
  5. Work attendance

Once recreational marijuana is legalized, usage will no doubt increase across the country.

The increase in casual marijuana usage paired with the administrative burden and uncertainty of legalization is new ground for Canadian employers. As such, to adequately prepare, it’s crucial that businesses adopt clear policies on the use of drugs and alcohol to prevent workplace accidents, increases in sick claims and decreases in employee productivity. Now more than ever before, both employers and employees must know how to discuss and deal with marijuana and impairment.

This guide is designed to provide a general background on marijuana use in the workplace, specifically highlighting its uses and health effects, legislative requirements, and employer and employee obligations. This guide should not construed as legal advice, and employers will need to consult with their legal team before implementing workplace policies and procedures related to marijuana and drugs.


Employer Guide to Cannabis Legalization

Cannabis, often referred to as weed, pot or marijuana, is one of the most commonly used psychoactive drugs in the world. And while the medicinal use of marijuana has been permissible in Canada for some time, the Cannabis Act legalizes the drug for recreational use nationwide.

Among other things, the federal law, which has a target implementation date of summer 2018, allows provinces to create specific regulations for marijuana use related to impaired driving and workplace safety. While this may sound simple on paper, a 2017 survey of Human Resources Professionals Association members found that 45 per cent of respondents did not believe their current workplace policies effectively address issues that may arise with the legalization of marijuana.

How Will the Act Affect the Workplace?

While it is uncertain how much the legalization of recreational marijuana will impact the workplace, employers are concerned it will have a direct effect on:

  1. Workplace health and safety
  2. The use of motor vehicles for work purposes
  3. The scope and type of disciplinary procedures
  4. Work performance
  5. Work attendance

Once recreational marijuana is legalized, usage will no doubt increase across the country.

The increase in casual marijuana usage paired with the administrative burden and uncertainty of legalization is new ground for Canadian employers. As such, to adequately prepare, it’s crucial that businesses adopt clear policies on the use of drugs and alcohol to prevent workplace accidents, increases in sick claims and decreases in employee productivity. Now more than ever before, both employers and employees must know how to discuss and deal with marijuana and impairment.

This guide is designed to provide a general background on marijuana use in the workplace, specifically highlighting its uses and health effects, legislative requirements, and employer and employee obligations. This guide should not construed as legal advice, and employers will need to consult with their legal team before implementing workplace policies and procedures related to marijuana and drugs.

Download the Employer’s Guide to Cannabis Legalization today.


Are You Prepared if Disaster Strikes?

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From fires to floods, earthquakes to hurricanes, disaster can strike anytime, anywhere, and often with little to no advance warning. According to the Insurance Information Institute, as many as 40 per cent of businesses forced to suspend operations due to a natural or human-caused disaster never reopen their doors.

Try to imagine the challenges your business would face in the wake of a natural disaster like the massive floods in 2013 or Superstorm Sandy. It’s scary to even consider. Now here’s something even scarier: A relatively minor fire or flood that forces you to shut down operations carries many of the same challenges as a disaster on the scale of last year’s floods or Sandy.

Your commercial property insurance policy would help you rebuild your physical infrastructure, but are you equipped to deal with lost revenue and mounting expenses while you work to restore operations?

Planning for the worst

The difference between surviving a business interruption and going belly-up often hinges on one factor: preparation.

The best way to prevent a disaster from putting the future of your business at risk is to have a proper continuity plan in place.

Business continuity planning involves:

  1. Defining potential risks
  2. Determining how those risks will affect operations
  3. Implementing safeguards and procedures designed to mitigate those risks
  4. Testing those procedures to ensure that they work
  5. Periodically reviewing the process to make sure that it is up to date

Start the process by establishing a planning team tasked with developing the continuity plan. Typical goals of your plan should include:

  • Protecting the safety of employees, visitors, contractors and others at risk from hazards at the facility
  • Maintaining customer service by minimizing interruptions or disruptions of business operations
  • Protecting facilities, physical assets and electronic information
  • Preventing environmental contamination
  • Protecting your organization’s brand, image and reputation

The planning process should take an “all hazards” approach. The probability that a specific hazard will impact your business is hard to determine—that’s why it’s important to consider many different threats and hazards and the likelihood they will occur. A business impact analysis can predict the consequences of an interruption and give you a good idea of how your operations would be affected in case you were forced to temporarily close.

Implementing the plan means more than simply exercising the plan during an emergency. It means acting on recommendations made during the hazard analysis, integrating the plan into company operations, training employees and evaluating the plan on an ongoing basis.

It is important to conduct a formal audit of the entire plan at least once a year to help identify any factors that may necessitate changes, such as updated regulations or new hazards.

Let us guide you through the process

No business owner wants to think about what would happen to the business if disaster strikes, but it’s a reality that all business owners must face. Megson FitzPatrick Insurance Services realizes it can be a daunting task to plan for a major business interruption—but it doesn’t have to be.

We can help you kick-start your planning efforts with a suite of industry-leading business continuity tools and resources, including a sample plan that can be tailored to meet the unique needs of your business. We can guide you step by step throughout the planning process, from assessing hazards to implementing safeguards to ensuring your plan stays up to date.

 


Snow & Ice Removal

Megson FitzPatrick, Insurance Brokers, Winter, Snow and Ice removal

Owners and managers of commercial property have an obligation to maintain safe conditions for employees and occupants. During the winter season, walkways, stairs, driveways, interior roadways and parking lots become slip and trip hazards as snow falls and ice forms. This is not only a safety hazard, it can also be an expensive legal issue for property owners, if an accident occurs.

To prevent injuries and minimize injury costs, commercial property owners should consider implementing a snow removal program using our checklist provided.

Download our free Snow and Ice Removal Checklist-2015